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Become a Star Wars droid engineer with littleBits

LittleBits announced the launch of its Droid Inventor Kit, which enables kids to create their own Droid.

An integral part of the global launch of Disney and Lucasfilm's Force Friday II, the Droid Inventor Kit brings Droids to life, inspiring imagination and invention for kids around the world.

The new kit aims to be intuitive so kids can easily create and power up their own mechanical companion using littleBits electronic Bits, along with the free Droid Inventor app.

They can then send their creation on more than 17 special Star Wars missions, complete with authentic droid sounds from the Star Wars films.

As they unlock new capabilities and level up their Droid Inventor skills, kids can also learn how to create their own custom R2 Units and experiences, combining play with real hands-on learning.

Ayah Bdeir, littleBits CEO says, “Today we are continuing a global inventors movement that empowers young people to participate in a story that inspires them to be creators, not just consumers of technology.”

“We’ve created a gender-inclusive product that celebrates kids’ own self-expression and ingenuity while showcasing the same characteristics of imagination, grit and invention that are embodied in the Star Wars franchise.”

With invention at its core, the Droid Inventor Kit fosters creativity and problem-solving skills.

In-app challenges encourage kids to reconfigure the littleBits technology in new and unique ways, in combination with household items, so they can create their own custom Droids such as a delivery Droid, a room guardian, and more.

The Droid Inventor Kit includes all the components needed for kids to create their very own Droid.

A free app completes the experience, providing step-by-step instructions and how-to videos.

The company says it is committed to bringing more girls into STEM and STEAM by designing products that are gender-inclusive and celebrating female inventors.

Jim Silver, TTPM CEO says, “The littleBits Droid Inventor Kit has the elements to be one of this year's hot toys.
“It combines the huge fandom of Star Wars, STEAM, and tons of creative fun.”

“Its open-ended design and deep engagement will be particularly appealing for both kids and parents, ensuring long-lasting interest through repeat play.”

The Droid Inventor Kit comes with 20 Droid parts, six Bits, three sticker sheets, as well as a free download of the littleBits Droid Inventor app.

LittleBits aims to empower kids around the world to become inventors.

Founded in 2011 by Ayah Bdeir, its innovative platform of easy-to-use electronic blocks allows anyone to create and prototype with electronics, independent of age, gender or technical ability.

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