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20th Century Fox and Samsung team-up to change how we experience TV

20th Century Fox, Panasonic and Samsung announced a new partnership to create an open, royalty-free dynamic metadata platform for HDR.

Together, the three companies will form a licensing entity that will begin licensing the HDR10+ platform in January 2018.

The entity will license the meta-data broadly to content companies, ultra-high definition TVs, Blu-ray disc players/recorders and set-top box manufacturers, as well as SoC vendors, royalty-free with only a nominal administrative fee.

Jongsuk Chu, Samsung visual display business SVP says, “As leaders in home entertainment content and hardware, the three companies are ideal partners for bringing HDR10+ into the homes of consumers everywhere.

“We are committed to making the latest technology available in our TVs and are confident that HDR10+ will deliver premium quality content and enhance the way you experience television programs and movies in the home.”

HDR10+ is a cutting-edge technology, building upon the benefits of HDR televisions, which offers the best possible viewing experience for next generation displays.

It provides unprecedented picture quality on all displays with brightness, colour, and contrast automatically optimised for each scene. 

In previous iterations, static tone mapping applied a fixed enhancement across an entire piece of content.

With HDR10+ dynamic tone mapping, every scene is individually enhanced to bring to life vibrant visuals and achieve unprecedented picture quality.

This enhanced visual experience will allow consumers to see pictures that match the intention of filmmakers.

Danny Kaye, 20th Century Fox EVP says, “HDR10+ is a technological step forward that optimises picture quality for next generation displays.

“HDR10+ provides dynamic metadata, which precisely describes every scene to deliver unprecedented picture quality.”

“Working in partnership with Panasonic and Samsung through the Fox Innovation Lab, we are able to bring new platforms like HDR10+ to the market that more accurately realise the vision of our filmmakers beyond the theatre.”

The HDR10+ platform was designed to allow for future development and innovation in order to deliver a more powerful technology in the years to come.

Yuki Kusumi, Panasonic executive officer says, “Panasonic has a long history of working with industry leaders to develop lasting technical formats.

“We are delighted to work together with 20th Century Fox and Samsung to develop a new HDR format, which will bring consumers so many benefits.” 

“By offering considerable HDR picture quality improvements across a wider range of TVs while accelerating the amount of premium HDR content available, we expect HDR10+ to quickly become the de-facto HDR format.”

The three companies will reveal more information about HDR10+ next year.

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