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Aussies fear Big Brother may steal data from old phones

TechCollect is calling for Australians to consider the environmental impact of not recycling their electronic waste as new research reveals almost half of Aussies are holding onto unused or broken electronic devices in case they need them again one day.

The research highlights 1 in 5 of survey respondents admit to being hoarders of old electronic devices. 

When asked why they don’t recycle their e-waste, 52% said they are worried they’ll lose personal data. 

Other reasons include not knowing where to recycle e-waste, not knowing it could be recycled, and not wanting to pay to have their device properly recycled.

Carmel Dollisson, TechCollect chief executive officer, says all Australians need to take an active role in being responsible for recycling the e-waste they are generating.

He states that “The challenge is encouraging consumers to let go of old devices they are no longer using or which are actually broken beyond repair, although devices can hold sentimental value, the non-renewable resources in them can be used in manufacturing when recycled correctly.” 

“Our new research tells us the average Australian household has approximately 17 electronic devices in the home and yet only 23% of us are always recycling them.”

“With the consumption of electronic devices getting higher all the time, it’s crucial consumers look at e-waste recycling as the natural next step in the product lifecycle, especially when it no longer serves its purpose to them.”


When asking respondents what they do with their unused electronic devices, only 33% admitted to actually recycling it at a designated drop-off site.

Dollisson continues, “What is concerning in the research is 53% of respondents don’t know they can take their e-waste to an e-waste collection site to avoid it going to landfill, and 63% don’t know if their local council recycles.

“These figures are definitely worrying to us, as the end users of these products, it’s important the public is informed about the important role they play in responsible e-waste recycling.”

“Taking e-waste to a designated drop-off site ensures materials that can be harmful to both people and the environment if put in a landfill, are correctly recovered or disposed of.”

The TechCollect survey explored respondents’ feelings of responsibility and guilt. 

For those who choose to recycle their e-waste, 74% do so because they feel responsible for the e-waste they produce.

TechCollect is a free national e-waste recycling service funded by many of Australia’s leading technology importers and manufacturers dedicated to responsible recycling, including Canon, Dell, HP, Fuji Xerox, Toshiba, Epson, Brother and many others.

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