Story image

Battery storage could be key to an emission-free NZ

Transpower released research into how battery storage could provide value for New Zealand’s power system.

Batteries provide the greatest potential at residential, commercial and industrial sites although benefits vary depending on where they are located.

The research investigates various applications for battery storage and considers how battery owners could derive revenue from providing the services that are required to operate the electricity system.

These applications were applied to case studies which were evaluated for a range of high-level assumptions using a range of industry metrics.

Stephen Jay, Grid Development general manager says, “We are preparing for what that future looks like and this battery research is the first of a number of reports we will release looking at technologies that could possibly have an impact on our business.

“Presently, battery owners are unlikely to be able to unlock the value of their battery until the appropriate market pricing and payment structures are available.”

“We believe that there is real potential and benefits from batteries for New Zealand consumers and we will support industry changes, such as market and pricing reforms, that allow battery owners to maximise their value.”

The research shows grid-connected batteries are not presently economic, but this is expected to change in the future.

Jay continues, “Last year, we released Transmission Tomorrow, a strategic outlook for the electricity industry that sets out our vision for how we can best prepare for unprecedented changes ahead in New Zealand’s energy industry.

“In that outlook, battery technologies are forecast as a ‘game changer’ in the long term, changing the operation and role of the National Grid, and we still believe this is the case.”

“Battery projects at lower voltage distribution substations and at a consumer level are forecast to be economical in the next few years, due to the declining cost of battery systems.”

Jay believes that over time they will also become economic for the high voltage transmission grid and this will then provide battery resilience across the whole supply chain.

Jay concludes, “We do not plan to carry out large-scale high voltage trials with batteries in the near term, but we will seek opportunities to work with and learn from others in joint projects where appropriate.” 

Transpower provides critical infrastructure, connecting remotely located electricity generation to electricity users across New Zealand and operating the power system in real time, matching supply to demand.

They work in sync with generators, distributors, retailers and technology providers to power Kiwi homes and businesses.

Royole's FlexPai: So bendable phablets are a reality now
A US-based firm called Royole is delivering on that age-old problem of not being able to fold up your devices (who hasn't ever wished they could fold their phone up...)
Hands-on review: Having fun in Knowledge is Power: Decades and Chimparty
They don’t revolutionise social video gaming, but they are enjoyable enough to occupy you during a wet weekend. 
Kiwis losing $24.7mil to scam calls every year
The losses are almost five times higher compared to the same period last year, from reported losses alone.
Tile's Mate & Pro Bluetooth trackers land in NZ
If your car keys (or your tablet) have disappeared into the void at the back of the couch or if you left them somewhere in your car, retracing your steps to find them could be a thing of the past.
Government still stuck in the past? Not on GovTech's watch
What exactly is GovTech and what’s been happening in our capital city?
"Is this for real?" The reality of fraud against New Zealanders
Is this for real? More often than not these days it can be hard to tell, and it’s okay to be a bit suspicious, especially when it comes to fraud.
Hands-on review: The iPhone Xs
The iPhone Xs is a win that brought numerous new and exciting features to the market.
How much does your Amazon Prime Video subscription really get you?
For our NZ$8.90 per month, the average cost per title is US$0.00126 - but we only really get a choice of 416 TV shows and 4321 movies. Choice is a little bit limited compared to other countries.