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Calling all creative students: $1000 cash prize up for grabs in Bright Awards

09 Aug 17

Digital design tertiary Institute Media Design School is on the hunt for up-and-coming creative talent from around the country. 

With the launch of The Bright Awards, an inaugural design competition aimed at secondary students in years 11 to 13, Media Design School is the first tertiary institute to offer students the opportunity to benchmark their creativity against their peers on the domestic stage.

Communications manager Analiese Jackson, the brains behind The Bright Awards, says the competition is a celebration of students who are bringing their creative craft to life. 

“The Bright Awards is a unique opportunity that supports schools, irrespective of decile or geographic location,” says Jackson. 

“We see this as a platform to empower and support young people across New Zealand in their creative endeavours.” 

“Judging by the diverse range of submissions that have already been received, it’s going to be a very exciting and robust competition,” Jackson says.

Media Design School is calling for entries in five broad categories - photography, graphic design, animation, app, and interactive; submissions for this category can span anything from functional websites to interactive installations or UX projects; and games.

The breadth of entries being accepted into the competition range from concepts or drawings to finished projects such as games and videos, giving students who have a creative bent but not necessarily the resources the chance to showcase their work in the nationwide competition.

Ten cash prizes are up for grabs: Students can win two major cash prizes, $1000 for themselves and $3000 for their school. 

Schools that demonstrate an ability to produce talented students in the fields of digital and traditional design could also be in the running for The Bright School of the Year Award. 

Entries will be judged by a panel of experts from Media Design School’s award-winning faculty headed by Jim Murray, programme co-ordinator of the Bachelor of Media Design.

Entries close September 15, 2017, and the winners will be announced on October 2, 2017. 

The Media Design School is the first tertiary institution in the Southern Hemisphere to offer a dedicated programme of study for 3D animation using industry-standard computer graphics software.

It is also the first school in New Zealand to provide a specialised games course for aspirational game developers. 

In October 2016, Media Design School became the first tertiary provider in New Zealand to offer a qualification with a dedicated stream focusing on Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality (VR/AR). 

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