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Crucial launches P1 NVMe Solid State Drive

18 Oct 18

Crucial’s P1 NVMe SSD, using the M.2 form-factor shuns your PCs SATA bus in favour of much more efficient PCIe technology. The result should be faster access and file writes.

The drives use Micron’s QLC technology. According to Crucial, PCMark 8 benchmarks show that the drive is capable of mixed-mode throughputs of up to 565MB/s, with a composite score of 5,084, which outperforms similar SSDs within the price category.  

“We’ve been using Crucial SSDs in our gaming rigs for the past year and a half,” says FNATIC Chief Gaming Officer Patrik Sattermon.

“The speeds the new P1 NVMe drive offers are impressive and we look forward to accelerated boot-ups and game loads. Plus, with some games now taking almost 100GB of space, the extra storage the new P1 SSD offers is most welcome. We’re excited to be installing these drives into our Team FNATIC systems.”  

Sequential read/write speeds are, apparently, up to 2,000/1,700 MB/s, this performance is courtesy of hybrid-dynamic write acceleration and SLC cache implementation. The drive offers an MTTF of 1.8 million hours and an endurance of up to 200TB total bytes written, with power usage at an active average of 100mW.

“We’ve been making SSDs for over a decade now, and we’ve watched computing habits change dramatically over that time,” says Micron Consumer Products Group vice president and general manager Teresa Kelley.

“The need for more system speed and storage has never been more important than it is today. That’s why we’ve paid special attention to our customers’ real-world computing tasks and designed the Crucial P1 SSD to deliver all the performance, capacity, and features they need at an affordable price point.”

Available in capacities up to 1TB, and backed by a five-year limited warranty, the Crucial P1 SSD leverages Micron quad-level cell (QLC) NAND technology.

By storing four bits in each NAND cell, QLC NAND narrows the affordability gap between hard drives and flash storage, enabling increased speeds and capacities at a more affordable price point.

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