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Fitbit takes on Beats with their new sweatproof headphones

Fitbit recently introduced the Fitbit Flyer, wireless headphones designed for fitness that combine powerful audio with a durable, sweatproof design and customisable fit.

These are the first wireless headphones to incorporate technology from Waves MaxxAudio, the Flyer delivers two sound profiles so users can personalise their listening experience.

The headphones promise seamless connectivity to Fitbit’s new Ionic smartwatch.

James Park, Fitbit CEO says, “As we launch our first smartwatch with on-device music, providing quality wireless headphones to better help users reach their goals is a natural extension of our product offerings.

“Coupled with research that shows 64% of fitness tracker owners are interested in purchasing wireless headphones, it makes sense for us to bring our unparalleled health and fitness expertise to this space.”

“We aim to deliver what our consumers are looking for the most, a great fit they can count on all day and for any workout, along with high-quality sound to keep them motivated.”

Built with fitness in mind, Flyer’s durable design includes a hydrophobic nano-coating that is rain, splash and sweatproof.

A series of interchangeable ear tips, wings and fins allow users to personalise the fit of their headphones to ensure comfort and a secure fit in their ear throughout any workout.

Fitbit states that with up to six hours of playtime, users will likely tire out before their headphones do.

Flyer’s 15-minute quick charge feature can also provide an extra hour of playtime.

Harley Pasternak, Fitbit ambassador says, “I see the positive effect music has on my clients every day, giving them the added push to workout harder and longer.

“With Fitbit Flyer, you get great looking, comfortable headphones that work perfectly with the new Fitbit smartwatch.”

“Paired with great sound quality, it will help keep your focus where it belongs, on your next repetition or walk, instead of worrying about your headphones staying in your ears.”

Fitbit claims that the Flyer has been precision engineered to offer high quality, clear audio with dynamic range, including features like AAC wireless codec and Passive Noise Isolation to improve sound quality and reduce the distraction of outside noises.

With two different sound settings on-device, signature and power boost, users can select the sound profile that’s right for them. 

The headphones are also compatible with digital assistants including Google Assistant and Siri.

The dual microphone enables hands-free phone calls, reducing external noises, such as wind and crowd-noise to ensure voice clarity.

Fitbit Flyer is available in two colours, lunar grey or nightfall blue, and will go on sale in October.

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