Story image

How virtual reality is making people more human-centric

01 Jun 2018

Article by business consultant Donna Howard

There are a lot of ways that the modern workplace is starting to change for the better.

From incorporating mindfulness practices, co-living retreats and now virtual reality, we are well on our way to leaving behind the for-profit mindset.

When it comes to embracing the human-powered workplace, virtual reality might just be the next big advancement that will help us become more caring and compassionate.

While this may seem counter-intuitive, there are several strong examples showing just how implementing virtual reality can help people feel more connected and compassionate.

For businesses, this has been a big step towards connecting with consumers in a more genuine way.

VR can help social enterprises

The rise of the social enterprise has been noticeable over the last decade.

As more socially-oriented workplaces have been cropping up, the younger generation of workers have shifted their focus from earning a higher paycheck, to fulfilling a higher purpose.

Virtual Village is a great example of how a business can use VR to bring people closer to a cause.

Users get to experience life in an African village while interacting with villagers in this virtual world, by helping them improve quality of life.

Creating empathy through the virtual experience allows socially-minded companies to grow their consumer base and increase revenue.

It’s surprisingly social

At this point, we are living in a digital world.

Most people are constantly connected to one device or another throughout the day, and many have speculated that being more connected has actually just made us more alone.

Recently, studies have shown that virtual reality that simulates a certain setting where individuals can potentially interact helped to facilitate conversation, especially amongst those that were more prone to be introverts.

VR could make design more intuitive

Design is a major part of our world and also how we relate to one another.

For example, design plays a role in how we communicate and relate to space.

Open spaces encourage people to come together and socialise, while closed off areas promote less stimulation and a relaxing environment.

As we become more aware of the crucial role that intelligent design plays in day to day human interactions, cities the world over are starting to implement more human-centric architecture and it looks like virtual reality may soon have a hand in improving design.

Architects and designers are already using VR technology to test out designs with potential users to see what works and what doesn’t, making sure the final product is something that will actually resonate with people not just their vision.

While it might not seem like putting on a headset will bring us closer together, it has already been shown that virtual reality can be considered as a catalyst to increased empathy and connection, especially in professional settings.

In the workplace, VR could be used to build trust amongst co-workers, while also encouraging the creation of a loyal consumer-base. 

While it’s certainly no replacement for face-to-face contact, it seems that virtual reality could definitely be the next best thing. 

WeRide demonstrates pre-commercial level 4 autonomous driving solutions
“Our demonstration of the Nissan LEAF 2 is a significant step forward in showing that WeRide can help bring reliable, safe autonomous vehicles to market."
IDC: Innovative wearable use cases drive double-digit growth
Wristbands are set to lose their dominance as hearables and industrial applications keep the wearables market moving forward.
Turtle Beach buys ROCCAT, bringing more 'victories to gamers'
Germany-based Roccat already has a significant presence in Europe and Asia, which means Turtle Beach will likely take advantage of that growth. Expect to see more Turtle Beach products on the shelves. 
NVIDIA introduces a new breed of high-performance workstations
“Data science is one of the fastest growing fields of computer science and impacts every industry."
Apple says its new iMacs are "pretty freaking powerful"
The company has chosen the tagline “Pretty. Freaking powerful” as the tagline – and it’s not too hard to see why.
Cloud providers increasingly jumping into gaming market
Aa number of major cloud service providers are uniquely placed to capitalise on the lucrative cloud gaming market.
NZ ISPs issue open letter to social media giants to discuss censorship
Content sharing platforms have a duty of care to proactively monitor for harmful content, act expeditiously to remove content which is flagged to them as illegal.
Partnership brings AI maths tutor to NZ schools
“AMY can understand why students make a mistake, and then teach them what they need straight away so they don't get stuck."