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Spark to open triple-level flagship store in Commercial Bay

02 Nov 2018

Spark will be one of the landmark retailers setting up shop in one of the country’s newest shopping destinations at Commercial Bay in Auckland next year.

Commercial Bay, which is currently being built near Auckland City’s Britomart, will house a three-level flagship Spark store in late 2019.

Spark says it will use the premium location to redefine the experience of visiting a Spark store. Spark head of retail Chris Fletcher adds that the move is also part of a broader resurgence in high street retail.

“We want to shift away from a traditional ‘telco’ shopping experience. Spark’s stores aren’t just a place to buy a new broadband plan or phone anymore,” says Fletcher. 

“Our customers come in store because they want advice on how to navigate their way through a range of technologies and digital choices. Spark Commercial Bay will offer customers that kind of broad experience and we are really excited to be part of the largest commercial and retail development in the country.”

He adds that Spark is also becoming a broader business as it meets customers’ changing needs.

“From becoming a destination for sport and entertainment to making it easier to find a plumber via WeDo or monitoring your assets like a car or boat via remote tracking – [customers] want to know how they can best stream online entertainment. They want advice on how to get their WiFi working brilliantly. They want to know what we can offer them to keep them more entertained or make their lives simpler to organise.”

Customers want to be able to touch and experience their options and then rely on expert guidance to help make their choices, Fletcher says.

The Commercial Bay district is managed by Precinct Properties. CEO Scott Pritchard says he’s excited to welcome Spark to Commercial Bay.

“[It adds] another significant retailer to the diverse offering available to consumers at the precinct. Spark is a leading digital services provider and at the forefront of offering customers a truly unique experience when shopping in stores. As we’re destined to become Auckland’s foremost shopping, dining and social hub, it’s only fitting to welcome one of New Zealand’s top brands.”

Fletcher adds that some stores are doing great things that act as a rebuttal to online-only shopping. “Of course, offering a seamless digital and online experience for Spark customers is incredibly important to us. But we believe that this needs to be completed with amazing ‘in real life’ locations where customers can come and engage with us in person.”

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