Final Cut Pro X introduces VR video editing

Apple announced a major update to its professional video editing app, Final Cut Pro X, bringing with it a host of new features including 360-degree VR video editing, advanced colour grading tools and support for High Dynamic Range (HDR) video.

Optimised to take full advantage of the incredible performance capabilities of the all-new iMac Pro, Final Cut Pro users can now edit full-resolution 8K video for the first time on a Mac. 

Apple is also extending 360-degree VR video support to Final Cut Pro companion apps, Motion and Compressor. 

Today, with more than 2 million seats, Final Cut Pro X is the most popular version of the software ever and is used by both casual and professional video editors.

Apple vice president of Apps Product Marketing Susan Prescott says, “With new features like 360-degree VR editing and motion graphics, advanced colour grading and HDR support, Final Cut Pro gives video editors the tools to create stunning, next-generation content.

“When combined with the performance of Mac hardware, including the all-new iMac Pro, Final Cut Pro provides an incredibly powerful post-production studio to millions of video editors around the world.”

Final Cut Pro lets professional editors create VR content with the ability to import, edit and deliver 360-degree video and view the project in real time through a connected HTC VIVE headset with SteamVR. 

Users can easily add 360-degree titles in 2D or 3D, apply blurs, glows and other effects.

Users can also use visual controls to straighten horizons or remove camera rigs from equirectangular videos. 

Standard photos and videos can also be added to VR projects and 360-degree video can be shared directly to popular websites including YouTube, Facebook and Vimeo.

The update also includes powerful tools for professional colour grading. 

Unique colour wheels feature built-in controls to adjust hue, saturation and brightness. 

Colour curves allow for ultra-fine colour adjustments with multiple control points to target specific colour ranges, and eye droppers let users sample specific colour and apply manual white balance. 

Users can also apply custom lookup tables (LUTs) from popular colour grading apps like DaVinci Resolve.

With support for the most popular HDR formats, Final Cut Pro gains access to an expanded range of brightness levels to deliver incredibly realistic images. 

Editors can output video to HDR monitors using I/O devices from AJA and Blackmagic with brightness levels up to 10,000 nits. 

The new colour grading tools support both HDR and Standard Dynamic Range (SDR) video, and with tone mapping, users can easily change HDR to SDR output for broadcast.

Final Cut Pro 10.4 is available as a free update for existing users.

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