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Hands-on review: Epson Moverio BT-200 AR Glasses

02 Nov 2015

We all know that Google are binning the consumer Augmented Reality (AR) Google Glass and going for an enterprise replacement. Epson (yes that Printer manufacturer) have taken a leap in creating their own version with full AR coverage.

The AR ride has been rocky - Google couldn’t get it to stick, yet Epson still maintain a hefty presence in the industry, with their product manager Eric Mizufuka active in the AR developer community.

The Moverio BT-200 focuses at the enterprise market, with gamification apps being available to promote its capabilities. The Moverio runs on Android, so you can create your own apps and upload them to the device.

Being a goggles wearer, I couldn’t move the Moverio as close to my eyes as I’d like, however they do a glasses insert so you can get lenses made that will fit it.

Once I had my contacts in, they were comfortable and not too heavy. The glasses come with a controller which contains the brains and the battery, so this weight isn’t on the glasses (a big bonus).

AR apps have the capability to add many features to enterprise, from manufacturing and CAD design shops, to those working in customer facing roles who can be provided lots of extra information discreetly.

As with any first generation products, there’s always improvements that you could add, yet the capabilities of the Moverio propose a future where we use overlaid information to better service the customer.

Yes, you do look like a Terminator with it on - they’re not discreet. But, there is a whole range of places they could find a home in due to the ease of developing Android apps.

As a toy, they’re a way of getting people interested in the capabilities of the devices, and how they can add to the business. As a tool, if you’re hooked up with a smart developer or agency, you might make some real leaps and bounds in your company.

Nice job Epson, you don’t need to just stick to printers. 

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