Story image

Learning to code gets even easier with Apple's Swift Playgrounds

22 Mar 17

Apple’s Swift Playground learning tool has been updated and is now available is five additional languages.

Swift Playground is Apple’s popular iPad app that helps students learn to code. It is now available in Simplified Chinese, Japanese, French, German and Latin American Spanish.

Swift Playgrounds is designed to make learning and experimenting with real code interactive and fun, and is ideal for students and beginners to explore working with Swift, the easy-to-learn programming language from Apple that is used by professional developers to create apps.

The app includes Apple-developed programming lessons, puzzles and challenges that teach core coding concepts, as well as built-in templates to encourage users to express their creativity and create real programmes.

“The Swift Playgrounds app has helped people of all ages learn the basics of coding, and with more than a million downloads to date, customers and students find it an easy and fun way to get started with Swift,” says Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO.

“Hundreds of thousands of iPhone and iPad apps, including some of the most popular in the App Store, use Swift — a programming language we designed to be both powerful and easy for anyone to learn.”

Swift Playgrounds performs best on iPad and Apple says it is a perfect companion app for the new 9.7-inch iPad, also announced today.

iPads are very popular with educators and students around the world, bringing them access to more than 180,000 educational apps built specifically for it and a wide selection of high quality Multi-Touch textbooks and rich digital content to personalise learning.

Pricing and Availability

Swift Playgrounds is available today for free in the App Store in English, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, French, German and Latin American Spanish. The app is compatible with all iPad models running iOS 10 or later.

Royole's FlexPai: So bendable phablets are a reality now
A US-based firm called Royole is delivering on that age-old problem of not being able to fold up your devices (who hasn't ever wished they could fold their phone up...)
Hands-on review: Having fun in Knowledge is Power: Decades and Chimparty
They don’t revolutionise social video gaming, but they are enjoyable enough to occupy you during a wet weekend. 
Kiwis losing $24.7mil to scam calls every year
The losses are almost five times higher compared to the same period last year, from reported losses alone.
Tile's Mate & Pro Bluetooth trackers land in NZ
If your car keys (or your tablet) have disappeared into the void at the back of the couch or if you left them somewhere in your car, retracing your steps to find them could be a thing of the past.
Government still stuck in the past? Not on GovTech's watch
What exactly is GovTech and what’s been happening in our capital city?
"Is this for real?" The reality of fraud against New Zealanders
Is this for real? More often than not these days it can be hard to tell, and it’s okay to be a bit suspicious, especially when it comes to fraud.
Hands-on review: The iPhone Xs
The iPhone Xs is a win that brought numerous new and exciting features to the market.
How much does your Amazon Prime Video subscription really get you?
For our NZ$8.90 per month, the average cost per title is US$0.00126 - but we only really get a choice of 416 TV shows and 4321 movies. Choice is a little bit limited compared to other countries.