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Edtech startup says Kiwi teachers are overworked & underpaid

11 Jun 2018

Teachers are overworked and underpaid – and to prepare our next generations for the tech evolutions, they need to be paid better.

That’s according to Kendall Flutey, the CEO of ed-tech company Banqer. Flutey says teachers are constantly adjusting to educating children in tech – the fastest growing sector in New Zealand,

She believes New Zealand needs to improve the digital revolutions in New Zealand, which means businesses, organisations and people need to reduce barriers – whether those barriers are devices, literacy, confidence, or capabilities.

She also says educators need to feel comfortable in the digital world. The creation of a digital-centric educational environment is critical to this comfort.

There is also still a lot of confusion about technology in education. Flutey says people confuse digital consumption with digital production – two very different fields.

We want our students to be producers because it's easy to get caught up in gimmicky tech,” she explains.

She also says the stigma around girls in technology still persists.

“The other remaining stigma is around girls and tech. We urgently need more females to get into tech as a career. People are doing awesome mahi (work) in this space, but this issue needs to be quashed. It's the last thing we need. Women who get into tech are doing amazing things.”

The integration of tech in education also has upsides.

“On the positive side, we are seeing an increasing personal approach to learning, mindfulness and other peripheral skills that develop the learner softer skills.”

“In coding, students are great consumers of tech, but they need to become the producers and leaders to really thrive.”

Banqer partners with Kiwibank to help more than 63,000 students in Australasia teaching students about saving, investing, borrowing and purchasing by turning the classroom into a virtual economy.

“Our team is made up of passionate New Zealanders all looking to improve the financial capabilities of our towns, cities, country and eventually our world. The problem we’re trying to tackle is a pretty big one, and we’re not the only people trying to improve this space,” the company explains on its website.

“That’s why we’re really excited about collaborating with some of New Zealand's big movers and shakers to realise Banqer’s full potential. We’re also lucky to be supported by several advisors and mentors that have been there, done that and have the success stories to go along with it.”

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