Story image

How should content be regulated in NZ?

28 Aug 15

As the conversation about digital convergence heats up, the New Zealand Government has released a discussion document which looks at whether policy and regulatory frameworks are fit-for-purpose in the current New Zealand media landscape.

The paper titled Content Regulation in a Converged World focuses on the merging of previously distinct broadcasting industries, which has produced a lack of clarity around the classification of content, advertising restrictions, and rules around election programmes during general elections.

This is a core part of the Government’s convergence work programme which was launched at the same time.

“We’re testing whether the rules are still fit for purpose and how they should be applied in a tech-neutral way. Currently, there is no consistent application of the appropriate rules,” says Amy Adams, Communications and Broadcasting Minister.

“This discussion document is about ensuring policy and legislation is durable, technology-neutral and supports innovation and change within the market while at the same time enabling business and consumers to reap the advantages of digital transformation,” she says.

The discussion paper highlights four areas where there are currently distinctions between technology types present in legislation.

The four areas highlighted in the report are: 

  • Content classification and standards
  • Inconsistencies between how election programmes are treated by the Broadcasting Act and Electoral Act
  • Advertising restrictions
  • Supporting local content.

“The Government wants to ensure policy and legislation reflects the realities of the converged media environment. I encourage all interested groups and organisations to take a look at the discussion paper and have their say,” says Adams.

The Green Paper titled Exploring Digital Convergence has been released in associated with the Government's work programme, focusing on what convergence means on a broader scale and highlighting opportunities and challenges for NZ.

Submissions for the discussion document close 16 October 2015. More information can be found at www.convergencediscussion.nz

Updated: Chch crypto-exchange Cryptopia suffers breach
Cryptopia has reportedly experienced a security breach that has taken the entire platform offline – and resulted in ‘significant losses’.
iPhone XS Max costs average Kiwi 11.6 work days – world comparison
A new study has compared how long it will take the average worker in 42 countries to purchase Apple's newest iPhone - NZ doesn't do too bad.
Chorus reckons Kiwis have an insatiable appetite for data
New Zealanders love the internet – and we love Fortnite even more.
Hands-on review: XANOVA Juturna-U gaming headset
Despite my first impressions on the quality of the headset, I was disappointed with both of the auxiliary cables provided, which felt cheap and would cut out, almost as if they were already frayed.
Audioengine’s Wireless A5+ are just bloody good speakers
I judge these speakers on the aspects that Audioengine boasts about - quality, streaming, simplicity and versatility
Hands-on review: The Ekster Wallet protects your cards against RFID attacks
For some time now, I’ve been protecting my credit cards with tinfoil. The tinfoil hat does attract a lot of comments, but thanks to Ekster, those days are now happily behind me.
OPPO aims to have 5G device launched by end of year
The Chinese smartphone manufacturer is working with Keysight Technologies to accelerate the development of their 5G smartphone.
LG makes TVs smarter with new AI processors
Latest TVs from LG use deep learning to enhance the video and audio output and introduces integration with Alexa.